Benefits of Massage
Useful for all of the conditions listed below and more, massage can:
 
•Alleviate low-back pain and improve range of motion.
•May assist with shorter, easier labor for expectant mothers and shorten maternity hospital stays.
•Ease medication dependence.
•Enhance immunity by stimulating lymph flow—the body's natural defense system.
•Exercise and stretch weak, tight, or atrophied muscles.
•Help athletes of any level prepare for, and recover from, strenuous workouts.
•Improve the condition of the body's largest organ—the skin.
•Increase joint flexibility.
•Lessen depression and anxiety.
•Promote tissue regeneration, reducing scar tissue and stretch marks.
•Pump oxygen and nutrients into tissues and vital organs, improving circulation.
•Reduce postsurgery adhesions and swelling.
•Reduce spasms and cramping.
•Relax and soften injured, tired, and overused muscles.
•Release endorphins—amino acids that work as the body's natural painkiller.
•Relieve migraine pain.

Types of Massage your therapist 
may incorporate based on your bodys needs:

Swedish Massage
The most common type of massage is Swedish massage therapy. It involves soft, long, kneading strokes, as well as light, rhythmic, tapping strokes, on topmost layers of muscles. This is also combined with movement of the joints. By relieving muscle tension, Swedish therapy can be both relaxing and energizing. And it may even help after an injury.
 
Neuromuscular Therapy Massage
Neuromuscular therapy is a form of soft tissue manipulation that aims to treat underlying causes of chronic pain involving the muscular and nervous systems. This medically-oriented form of massage addresses trigger points (tender muscles points), circulation, nerve compression, postural issues, and biomechanical problems that can be caused by repetitive movement injuries.
 
Deep Tissue Massage
Deep tissue massage is best for giving attention to certain painful, stiff "trouble spots" in your body. The massage therapist uses slow, deliberate strokes that focus pressure on layers of muscles, tendons, or other tissues deep under your skin. Though less rhythmic than other types of massage, deep tissue massage can be quite therapeutic -- relieving chronic patterns of tension and helping with muscle injuries, such as back sprain.
 
 
 
Shiatsu Massage
In Japanese, shiatsu means "finger pressure." For shiatsu massage, the therapist uses varied, rhythmic pressure on certain precise points of the body. These points are called acupressure points, and they are believed to be important for the flow of the body's vital energy, called chi. Proponents say shiatsu massage can help relieve blockages at these acupressure points.
 
Thai Massage
During a Thai massage, the therapist uses his or her body to move the client into a variety of positions. This type of massage includes compression of muscles, mobilization of joints, and acupressure.
 
Hot Stone Massage
For this kind of massage, the therapist places warmed stones on certain areas of the body, such as acupressure points. The stones may be used as massage tools or be temporarily left in place. Used along with other massage techniques, hot stones can be quite soothing and relaxing as they transmit heat deep into the body.
 
Sports Massage
Developed to help with muscle systems used for a particular sport, sports massage uses a variety of approaches to help athletes in training -- before, during, or after sports events. You might use it to promote flexibility and help prevent injuries. Or, it may help muscle strains, aiding healing after a sports injury.